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ALPA Refutes Pilot Shortage

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ALPA Refutes Pilot Shortage

Unread postby jjbaker » Thu Feb 13, 2014 7:11 am

:cheers:

The thousands of airline pilots who are furloughed or working overseas when they would prefer to fly for a U.S. airline and live in this country makes it clear that no shortage of trained and qualified airline pilots currently exists in the United States, according to the Air Line Pilots Association, Int’l (ALPA). “There may be a shortage of qualified pilots who are willing to fly for U.S. airlines because of the industry’s recent history of instability, poor pay, and benefits,” said Capt. Lee Moak, president of ALPA. “But thousands of highly qualified and experienced U.S. airline pilots are either furloughed or working overseas and eager to return to U.S airline cockpits—under the right conditions.” According to ALPA, some 1,154 of its members are currently are furloughed from their airlines, including Comair, which closed in 2012 and furloughed more than 850 trained and experienced pilots, nearly all of whom are looking for jobs; and ASTAR, Evergreen and Ryan, which shut down and put some 800 pilots out of work.

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ALPA said that thousands of U.S. pilots now fly for foreign airlines because those airlines’ stability, pay, and benefits are much greater than those offered by U.S airlines. They pointed out that the average first officer (copilot) starting salary at 14 U.S. regional airlines is $21,285/year plus benefits and that Delta and United start copilots at $61,000/year plus benefits, while at Emirates Airlines, new-hire copilots receive $82,000/year plus a housing allowance and other extraordinary benefits. Similarly, Cathay Pacific pays new copilots $72,000/year plus a housing allowance and other extraordinary benefits. Many expatriate U.S. pilots say they would return to the United States if airline industry conditions improve here. Capt. Moak asserted, “The real solution to preventing any future pilot shortage is for airlines to produce consistently profitable results. Congress can support this goal by implementing pro-growth aviation policies that reduce the tax burden on airlines and give the industry an opportunity to compete and prevail in the international marketplace.”


Source: AVWeb
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Re: ALPA Refutes Pilot Shortage

Unread postby RKittine » Thu Feb 13, 2014 10:05 am

Obama's increasing of the minimum wage to Federal Workers of $10.10 per hour, brings those employees, to $21,000 per year. Pretty bad that an FO is making under $22K to start with a regional.

As I stated in another thread about pilot starts, there is not a lot of fcareer financial incentive for the demographic who could typically afford to learn to fly (people who would probably have money and the education level to go to college and get better paying jobs as bad as out job market is). Somehow there is a need to re-instate Excitement in flying.

Cessna used to sponsor a program for low cost first flights to help increase the pilot training starts, but with the closing of some many Cessna Pilot centers after 1986, you do not fing too many palces offering discounted introductory flights, at least not around this neck of the woods.

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Re: ALPA Refutes Pilot Shortage

Unread postby jjbaker » Thu Feb 13, 2014 11:15 am

I don't see a real benefit in offering discounted intro flights, though. The future student is going to need to have the money to finish their private, which at current average is a ~ $10K investment into a hobby that is under the gun any possible way imaginable. We have managed to make technology quantum jumps in the last 10 years and all it has really done was to make prices go up and create button pushing monkeys who will rip an airplane into a stall/ spin the second anything doesn't go as planned. Today's kids can't get excited about anything unless it feeds their narcissistic and mostly self centered lifestyle, and there is an epidemic of behaviorally challenged children growing up blind to everything other than themselves, Facebook and more self expression games than ever before in the history of man. Talking to anyone in education will prove this point. We are competing with much less expensive and effort laden activities with communities that are much friendlier and welcoming to new people. I can walk any local airport and find myself not having talked to a single person. Can't do the same in my boat yard, ATV club or at the local camping/ tenting range. People tout busy lifestyles with limited family time. Verizon FIOS advertises fast internet service so that "busy work like a dog" adults can have more time with family, even if its just to sit around the dinnertable and type things into Facebook. Payments go into upside down mortgages, groceries and the other big self expression tool in the U.S. - Cars, Minivans and SUV's. All of them are built to be luxurious little self expression entertainment centers. Allow no boredom, allow no distraction to online/ screen based entertainment. No more "I SPY" games with the kids, it interferes with Facebook, besides the car saw that bicyclist first, anyways.... :lol:

Wanna have students and pilots sticking around at the airport - involve their families and kids.

What I am trying to say is that no matter how hard we try to make it interesting and exciting, it takes more than little princess and princes to build the future of aviation professionals. Its not an instant reward/ instant success field to get into, with many like me walking away from it for lack of opportunity. It takes a special character to get into the airline industry these days, especially with the pay and benefits being such a joke. A couple or maybe three major airline pilot training facilities can easily fill demand for the airlines flying their little Cirrus Computergames around. It also takes a special character to justify the cost of obtaining a pilot certificate. Discretionary spending money is down, so people will cut and spend on things that bring them closer together, not out of the house and gone/ possibly dead, as the press and media would have everyone believe.
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Re: ALPA Refutes Pilot Shortage

Unread postby RKittine » Thu Feb 13, 2014 11:39 am

The intro flights were not for people who could NOT afford flight training, but an incentive for people who had no burning interest (hence willing to spend the money they had) to learn how to fly and therefore provided an opportunity for someone to maybe, albiet not many did, take the intro flight and get excited enough to want to go forward.

We run family oriented days at Warwick with Tenant Appreciation Day, Open House Weekends, Young Eagles, with BBQs for the families and the RC Weekends, but no new pilot starts.

Oh, well, more open air space up there for me and my little Champ.

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Re: ALPA Refutes Pilot Shortage

Unread postby jjbaker » Thu Feb 13, 2014 12:02 pm

I found the same thing with the cheap intro flights. No burning desire to spend money and generally it took some selling to get them to do an intro. One gracefully took one of my King & Jeppesen Intro DVD's and never returned them. The two $400K in toys in the hangar never made a dollar of revenue off of him. None of those "customers" ever brought a single dime to our school. Lost our last student to a school that quoted minimum rates for minimum (unrealistic) flight time to certificate completion. He quit shortly before having 45 hours with no solo, yet. Honesty killed that cat and we had two Cessna Sky Crappers on order to expand. Both glad we got out when we did. That was shortly before I started this forum and you can tell what a crux it is to get members to help keep it alive.

I predict that the pilot shortage will be as imaginary as it has always been.
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Re: ALPA Refutes Pilot Shortage

Unread postby RKittine » Thu Feb 13, 2014 1:02 pm

I think you are right about the shortage. At my age, I am not too worried about who starts or what new airplanes that come out. Just want to keep flying for as long as I can in what ever I can. Same with my Ham Radio, I keep talking to fewer and fewer new people, but like all the old times anyway.

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Re: ALPA Refutes Pilot Shortage

Unread postby jjbaker » Fri Feb 21, 2014 8:51 am

A not so artificial shortage is happening and this won't be very fun!

National clown shortage may be approaching, trade organizations fear

Membership at the country’s largest trade organizations for the jokesters has plunged over the past decade as declining interest, old age and higher standards among employers align against Krusty, Bozo and their crimson-nosed colleagues.

“What’s happening is attrition,” said Clowns of America International President Glen Kohlberger, who added that membership at the Florida-based organization has plummeted since 2006. “The older clowns are passing away.”

Membership at the World Clown Association, the country’s largest trade group for clowns, has dropped from about 3,500 to 2,500 since 2004.

“The challenge is getting younger people involved in clowning,” said Association President Deanna (Dee Dee) Hartmier, who said most of her members are over 40.

Kohlberger said that it’s difficult getting younger people who develop an early interest in the many facets of clowning to stick with it on the professional level.

The lack of wannabe Bozos has yet to hurt the big top at the “Greatest Show on Earth.” The 95-year-old Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus has even implemented a more rigorous hiring process to find just the right jester.

As a result of the more challenging tryouts, just 11 clowns out of 14 who were selected from 531 applicants to attend a rigorous 14-day boot camp at the Ringling Bros. Clown College last year were offered jobs with the world-famous circus.

There’s no goofing around at the training where clowns get the chance to learn the fine points of floppy shoes and wildly colored wigs from veteran performers.

Just 12 clowns will be featured in the circus’ all-new performance at the Barclays Center called “Legends,” which will run from Thursday through March 2.

The circus keeps about 26 clowns on its roster for its three touring shows.

“Our audience expects to be wowed,” said David Kiser, Ringling Bros. director of talent. “No longer is it good enough to just drop your pants and focus on boxer shorts.”


Source: http://www.nydailynews.com/news/nat...e ... z2to61WgkG

:(
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Re: ALPA Refutes Pilot Shortage

Unread postby RKittine » Fri Feb 21, 2014 9:31 am

See what happens when they require 1500 hours of jokes to become a professional. Just like aviation.
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Re: ALPA Refutes Pilot Shortage

Unread postby KlausNW » Fri Feb 21, 2014 4:09 pm

The clown shortage is because we voted them into politics. In reality, if they counted the clowns in politics... They would find the clown profession is 10 fold.

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Re: ALPA Refutes Pilot Shortage

Unread postby RKittine » Fri Feb 21, 2014 4:10 pm

Now that is the truth ........
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Re: ALPA Refutes Pilot Shortage

Unread postby jjbaker » Sun Mar 02, 2014 7:56 pm

Now the real clowns have spoken... The Government Accountability Office...

:dance:

According to ALPA, the average starting salary for First Officers in regional airlines is $22,400, but the GAO report found pay levels below that. For example, the First Officer killed in the 2009 Colgan Air crash at Buffalo in 2009 had earned only $16,000 in the previous year of her employment at the airline. For its part, ALPA has questioned claims of pilots shortages, claiming there are enough pilots to fill the ranks, but that fewer are willing to work for the low entry salaries the industry is offering.

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Regionals are beginning to respond to their hiring shortfalls by offering hiring bonuses. Two regionals, according to GAO, have offered $5000 hiring bonuses and one offers up to $10,000 in tuition reimbursement. But rather than bringing new hires into the industry, these efforts have tended to attract applicants away from other, poorer paying regionals, according to the GAO’s findings.

In addition to hiring bonuses, the GAO report recommends that airlines might consider training their own pilots and improve wages, benefits and working conditions to attract qualified applicants. It also suggests relaxing hiring requirements, but the Airline Safety and FAA Extension Act of 2010, requiring a 1500-hour minimum and ATP for First Officers doesn’t give airlines much leeway in minimum requirements.


Source: http://www.avweb.com/avwebflash/news/GA ... 523-1.html
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Re: ALPA Refutes Pilot Shortage

Unread postby RKittine » Mon Mar 03, 2014 7:07 am

There was an interesting article on CNN news the other day that covered statistics on the number of correct age range Commercially Licensed pilots that are not flying for a living. They also stated numbers of currently furloughed commercial pilots and refuted the lack of pilots too, but went on to say that current pay levels do not provide a big incentive for pilots to pay for their own training in this country in order to get a job flying for a living.

A lot of young people that are driven and not on their computers, iPhones and X Boxes all day do find a way to spend tens of thousands of dollars to go to College and then Law School in order to join the ranks of the attorneys who have a much better chance of making big money. So that is another reason for some of the decline in pilot starts.

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